Save Money…Better Compliance…Good Idea?

Opportunity:

A laboratory services company that provides analysis of organic, inorganic, biological, hazardous, and other materials. With these types of materials and chemicals, employees cannot wear contact lenses in the facility. Safety Prescription Eyewear must be used. Also, their work staff has a higher percentage of Prescription Eyewear users than the average factory. These aspects exaggerated the cost of an Rx eyewear program.
With the hiring of a new Safety Manager, she was eager to find new ways to keep employees safer and to look for ways to cut PPE cost. Rx Eyewear was a logical first step.
Alternatives:

Each employee was able to choose their own Rx style from their current Rx provider. Though all lenses and frames choices met  ANSI Z87+ standards, employees had little regard to the coverage and protection of the eyewear they chose. Most eyewear was chosen based on style.

Since everyone had different tastes in style, there was no uniformity. This made it difficult for the safety manager to quickly verify everyone was wearing compliant eyewear.

Solutions:

The Klondike Plus with the KDRX prescription insert solved multiple problems.

1st – The KD3 was designed as protective eyewear, therefore offers better coverage and protection than most Safety Rx frames

2nd – The entire facility can now wear the same style eyewear making it easy for Managers to verify if employees are wearing the proper eye protection

3rd – The cost of a KD310 & KDRX ensemble is much less than average Safety Rx frames.

Implementation:

The company stocks product # KD310 in the storeroom for all employees (Rx or no Rx). Employees that need prescription eyewear receive product # KDRX which they take to the local Wal-Mart where the company pays $55 to have their prescription filled. The KDRX insert is affixed to the inside of the KD310.

Observation:

After the first 6 months of implementing the new program, the safety manager, operations manager, and employees saw many benefits from the KDRX program.

Employees had improved field of vision since the KD310 has a wrap around style. Employees didn’t have to continue using scratched and spattered lenses like before since they could throw the outer KD310 glasses away and get a new one when needed. Employees can now choose different lens tint options like Amber, Light Blue, and Indoor/Outdoor. The purchasing manager is happy because of the cost saving…see chart below.

Cost Analysis:

1 pair of Rx Safety Eyewear every year =  $250.00* average cost per pair

Number of employees = 42

Total cost per year  =  $10,500.00

Total cost every 2 years  =  $21,000.00

Versus

Best Case

1  KDRX Insert every 2 years ($55 + $10) = $65

6 pair of KD310 every year (x 2 years) = $40.80

Total cost every 2 years (x 42 employees) = $4,443.60

Cost savings per 2 years   =  $16,556.40

Worst Case

1 KDRX Insert every year ($65 x 2 years) = $130

12 Pair of KD310 every year (x 2 years) = $81.60

Total cost every 2 years (x 42 employees) = $8,887.20

Cost savings per 2 years  = $12,112.80

Time from initial opportunity to implementation:

3 months

Special Thanks to Jay McNeil, Sales Manager for MCR Safety for this case study.

Do OSHA Inspections Work?

* 9.4% drop in injury claims at workplaces in the four years following an inspection
* 26% average savings on workers’ compensation costs compared to similar, non-inspected
* $355,000 average savings for an employer (small or large) as a result of an OSHA inspection
* $6 billion estimated savings to employers nationwide

It’s Official: OSHA Doesn’t Kill Jobs. It Stops Jobs from Killing Workers

A landmark new study by business school economists at the University of California and Harvard University confirms that OSHA’s inspections not only prevent workers from getting hurt on the job, they also save billions of dollars for employers through reduced workers’ compensation costs.

The study was entitled “Randomized Government Safety Inspections Reduce Worker Injuries with No Detectable Job Loss

** Information From special Edition of OSHA Quick Takes May 29, 2012